What Is The Herb Sage Used For

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Sage

The genus, Salvia is the largest in the mint (Labitae), family with over 800 species represented. Salvia derives from the Latin salvere (“to save”), referring to the long-held belief in the herb’s healing properties. Pliny the Elder was the first author known to describe a plant called “Salvia” by the Romans. It has ben used widely as a culinary herb and traditional plant for a long list of functions. The plant has trichomes or hair like structures on the undersides of the leaves that when broken release stores of volatile oils which impart characteristic flavor and properties. Sage was officially listed in the United States Pharmacopoeia from 1840 to 1900.

9 Emerging Benefits and Uses of Sage Tea

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Sage tea is an aromatic infusion made from the leaves of common sage (Salvia officinalis), an herb in the same family as mint.

Commonly used as a spice, sage also has a long history of use in alternative and traditional medicine. Notably, its tea is packed with potential health benefits — although scientific research on this drink is still in its preliminary stages.

1. Rich in anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compounds

Sage tea contains a variety of powerful plant compounds.

In particular, its antioxidants work to neutralize harmful compounds called free radicals. When these accumulate in your body, they can lead to chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes and certain cancers

Sage tea is particularly high in rosmarinic acid. Animal and test-tube studies have shown that this antioxidant provides numerous benefits, such as decreased inflammation and blood sugar levels

While inflammation is a natural bodily response, chronic inflammation can increase your risk of illness.

Sage likewise provides a fair amount of vitamin K, which is essential for bone health, circulation, and p

What’s more, this tea boasts several other health-promoting compounds, including carnosol and camphor

In a mouse study, sage extract significantly increased the levels of anti-inflammatory compounds circulating in the blood while decreasing the levels of inflammatory compound

Sage tea’s anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects may be responsible for many of its purported benefits, but more human research is necessary

2. May promote healthy skin and wound healing

Sage is a common ingredient in cosmetics that are applied topically as a natural skin care remedy.

It’s possible that drinking its tea provides some of the same benefits.

In a test-tube study on mouse skin cells, camphor — one of sage’s key compounds — was found to promote healthy skin-cell growth, slow signs of aging, and decrease wrinkle formation (

In addition, an animal study associated this herb’s carnosol and carnosic acid with helping treat sun-related skin damage and other inflammatory skin problems

Other animal studies show that sage extract helps heal cold sores and speeds wound healing .

Moreover, test-tube studies have demonstrated that its extract killed certain harmful bacteria and fungi that could damage your skin

3. Promotes oral health

Sage is one of the most popular herbs in dentistry, as it targets pain, inflammation, and bad breath, as well as exerts antibacterial and wound-healing properties

In fact, gargling sage tea is often recommended as a remedy for mouth wounds and sore throats

These oral benefits are often attributed to the powerful antioxidant rosmarinic acid

Furthermore, sage is added to some mouthwashes because of its antibacterial and

4. May have anticancer properties

There is some evidence that sage tea may help fight cancer cells.

It contains several anticancer compounds, including carnosol, camphor, and rosmarinic acid. In particular, animal and test-tube studies reveal that carnosol can kill several types of cancer cells without affecting healthy cells

In a study in over 500 people, sage and chamomile teas were linked to a decreased risk of thyroid cancer

Meanwhile, in a test-tube study, sage tea helped prevent genetic changes that cause colon cancer cell formation

Although these results are promising, more human research is necessary.

5. Improves blood sugar control

Sage, which is a frequent ingredient in alternative blood sugar medications, may help improve blood sugar levels and prevent or treat type 2 diabetes.

A 2-month study in 105 adults with type 2 diabetes found supplementing with 500 mg of sage extract 3 times daily improved fasting blood sugar, post-meal blood sugar, and hemoglobin A1c — a measure of average blood sugar levels over the previous 3 months

Meanwhile, a mouse study determined that replacing water with sage tea reduced fasting

Furthermore, a test-tube study suggested that sage behaves similarly to insulin — a hormone that helps manage blood sugar levels — by moving sugar in your blood into your cells for storage, thus lowering levels of this marker

6. May promote brain health and improve mood

Sage is widely used in alternative medicine to boost mood, improve memory, and help prevent brain-related disorders like Alzheimer’s. Scientific research backs many of these uses

Alzheimer’s progresses due to amyloid plaques that form in the brain. Several test-tube and animal studies indicate that sage and rosmarinic acid may help prevent the formation of these plaques

In addition, multiple human studies note that sage extracts improve memory, brain function, mood, and focus

One study in 135 adults found that simply smelling the aroma of this herb boosted memory and mood, compared with a control group

Sage may relieve pain as well, but more research is needed on its effects on the brain and nervous system

7. May support women’s health

Sage may also provide some unique benefits for women.

In the Middle East, pregnant women commonly use sage to treat digestive symptoms like nausea, a common problem early in pregnancy

Historically, sage has also been utilized as a natural way to reduce breast milk production in women who are weaning or have an overabundant supply

However, there is little research to support either of these traditional uses.

Yet, research demonstrates that sage helps reduce hot flashes. An 8-week study in 71 menopausal women found that taking a daily tablet containing fresh sage reduced the severity and frequency of hot flashes by 64%

8. May boost heart health

Some research indicates that sage may help improve cholesterol and triglyceride levels, potentially decreasing your risk of heart disease.

In a small, 4-week study in 6 women, drinking 10 ounces (300 ml) of sage tea twice daily resulted in 16% lower total cholesterol, 20% lower LDL (bad) cholesterol, and 38% higher HDL (good) cholesterol (40Trusted Source).

A 2-month study in 105 people with type 2 diabetes on cholesterol-lowering drugs found that those who took 500 mg of sage extract 3 times daily had healthier levels of triglycerides and all cholesterol markers, compared with those in the control group (23Trusted Source).

9. Easy to add to your diet

Sage tea is easy to add to your diet, as you can purchase tea bags online or at most grocery stores.

You can also make this aromatic beverage at home with the following ingredients:

Simply bring the water to a boil, then add the sage and steep for about 5 minutes. Strain to remove the leaves before adding your preferred sweetener and lemon juice to taste.

12 Health Benefits and Uses of Sage

Sage is a staple herb in various cuisines around the world.

Its other names include common sage, garden sage and Salvia officinalis. It belongs to the mint family, alongside other herbs like oregano, rosemary, basil and thyme

Sage has a strong aroma and earthy flavor, which is why it’s typically used in small amounts. Even so, it’s packed with a variety of important nutrients and compounds.

Sage is also used as a natural cleaning agent, pesticide and ritual object in spiritual sage burning or smudging.

This green herb is available fresh, dried or in oil form — and has numerous health benefits.

Here are 12 surprising health benefits of sage.

1. High in Several Nutrients

Sage packs a healthy dose of vitamins and minerals.

One teaspoon (0.7 grams) of ground sage contains

As you can see, a small amount of sage packs 10% of your daily vitamin K needs

Sage also contains small amounts of magnesium, zinc, copper and vitamins A, C and E.

What’s more, this aromatic spice houses caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, rosmarinic acid, ellagic acid and rutin — all of which play a role in its beneficial health effects

Since it’s consumed in tiny amounts, sage provides only minuscule amounts of carbs, calories, protein and fiber.Summary Sage is rich in nutrients — especially vitamin K — despite being low in calories. One teaspoon (0.7 grams) boasts 10% of your daily vitamin K needs.

2. Loaded With Antioxidants

Antioxidants are molecules that help fortify your body’s defenses, neutralizing potentially harmful free radicals that are linked to chronic diseases

Sage contains over 160 distinct polyphenols, which are plant-based chemical compounds that act as antioxidants in your body

Chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, rosmarinic acid, ellagic acid and rutin — all found in sage — are linked to impressive health benefits, such as a lower risk of cancer and improved brain function and memory

One study found that drinking 1 cup (240 ml) of sage tea twice daily significantly increased antioxidant defenses. It also lowered both total cholesterol and “bad” LDL cholesterol, as well as raised “good” HDL cholesterol Sage is loaded with antioxidants that are linked to several health benefits, including improved brain function and lower cancer risk.

3. May Support Oral Health

Sage has antimicrobial effects, which can neutralize microbes that promote dental plaque.

In one study, a sage-based mouthwash was shown to effectively kill the Streptococcus mu-tans bacteria, which is notorious for causing dental cavities

In a test-tube study, a sage-based essential oil was shown to kill and halt the spread of Candida albicans, a fungus that may also cause cavities

One review noted that sage may treat throat infections, dental abscesses, infected gums and mouth ulcers. However, more human research is needed to make comprehensive recommendations

4. May Ease Menopause Symptoms

During menopause, your body experiences a natural decline in the hormone estrogen. This can cause a wide range of unpleasant symptoms.

Symptoms include hot flashes, excessive sweating, vaginal dryness and irritability.

Common sage was traditionally used to reduce menopause symptoms (12Trusted Source).

It’s believed that compounds in sage have estrogen-like properties, allowing them to bind to certain receptors in your brain to help improve memory and treat hot flashes and excessive sweating

In one study, daily use of a sage supplement significantly reduced the number and intensity of hot flashes over eight weeks

5. May Reduce Blood Sugar Levels

The leaves of common sage have been used traditionally as a remedy against diabetes.

Human and animal research indicates that it may help lower blood sugar levels.

In one study, sage extract reduced blood glucose levels in rats with type 1 diabetes by activating a specific receptor. When this receptor is activated, it can help clear excess free fatty acids in the blood, which in turn improves insulin sensitivity

Another study in mice with type 2 diabetes found that sage tea acts like metformin — a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar in people with the same disease

In humans, sage leaf extract has been shown to lower blood sugar and improve insulin sensitivity with a similar effect as rosiglitazone, another anti-diabetes drug

However, there is still not enough evidence to recommend sage as a diabetes treatment. More human research is needed.

6. May Support Memory and Brain Health

Sage can help support your brain and memory in several ways.

For one, it’s loaded with compounds that can act as antioxidants, which have been shown to buffer your brain’s defense system

It also appears to halt the breakdown of the chemical messenger acetylcholine (ACH), which has a role in memory. ACH levels appear to fall in Alzheimer’s disease

In one study, 39 participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease consumed either 60 drops (2 ml) of a sage extract supplement or a placebo daily for four months.

Those taking the sage extract performed better on tests that measured memory, problem-solving, reasoning and other cognitive abilities

In healthy adults, sage was shown to improve memory in low doses. Higher doses also elevated mood and increased alertness, calmness and contentedness

In both younger and older adults, sage appears to improve memory and brain function

7. May Lower ‘Bad’ LDL Cholesterol

Every minute, more than one person in the US dies from heart disease

High “bad” LDL cholesterol is a key heart disease risk factor, affecting one in three Americans

Sage may help lower “bad” LDL cholesterol, which can build up in your arteries and potentially cause damage.

In one study, consuming sage tea twice daily lowered “bad” LDL cholesterol and total blood cholesterol while raising “good” HDL cholesterol after just two weeks

Several other human studies illustrate a similar effect with sage extract

8. May Protect Against Certain Cancers

Cancer is a leading cause of death in which cells grow abnormally.

Interestingly, animal and test-tube studies demonstrate that sage may fight certain types of cancer, including those of the mouth, colon, liver, cervix, breast, skin and kidney

In these studies, sage extracts not only suppress the growth of cancer cells but also stimulate cell death.

While this research is encouraging, human studies are needed to determine whether sage is effective at fighting cancer in humans.

9–11. Other Potential Health Benefits

Sage and its compounds are linked to several other health benefits.

However, these benefits have not been extensively researched.

  1. May alleviate diarrhea: Fresh sage is a traditional remedy for diarrhea. Test-tube and animal studies found that it contains compounds that may alleviate diarrhea by relaxing your gut
  2. May support bone health: Vitamin K, which sage offers in large amounts, plays a role in bone health. A deficiency in this vitamin is linked to bone thinning and fractures
  3. May combat skin aging: Several test-tube studies suggest that sage compounds may help fight signs of aging, such as wrinkles

12. Easy to Add to Your Diet

Sage comes in several forms and can be used in a variety of ways.

Fresh sage leaves have a strong aromatic flavor and are best used sparingly in dishes.

Here are some ways you can add fresh sage to your diet:

  • Sprinkle as a garnish on soups.
  • Mix into a stuffing in roast dishes.
  • Combine chopped leaves with butter to make sage butter.
  • Add chopped leaves to tomato sauce.
  • Serve it with eggs in an omelet.

Dried sage is often preferred by cooks and comes ground, rubbed or in whole leaves.

What is Sage?

Sage is an herb. The leaf is used to make medicine.

Sage is used for digestive problems, including loss of appetite, gas (flatulence), stomach pain (gastritis), diarrhea, bloating, and heartburn. It is also used for reducing overproduction of perspiration and saliva; and for depression, memory loss, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Women use sage for painful menstrual periods, to correct excessive milk flow during nursing, and to reduce hot flashes during menopause.

Sage is applied directly to the skin for cold sores; gum disease (gingivitis); sore mouth, throat or tongue; and swollen, painful nasal passages.

Some people inhale sage for asthma.

In foods, sage is used as a commonly used spice.

In manufacturing, sage is used as a fragrance component in soaps and cosmetics.

Sage Benefits

Sage has one of the longest histories of use of any culinary or medicinal herb. Ancient Egyptians used it as a fertility drug (Bown, 1995). In the first century C.E. Greek physician Dioscorides reported that the aqueous decoration of sage stopped bleeding of wounds and cleaned ulcers and sores. He also recommended sage juice in warm water for hoarseness and coughs. It was used by herbalists externally to treat sprains, swelling, ulcers, and bleeding.

Internally, a tea made from sage leaves has had a long history of use to treat sore throats and coughs; often by gargling. It was also used by herbalists for rheumatism, excessive menstrual bleeding, and to dry up a mother’s milk when nursing was stopped. It was particularly noted for strengthening the nervous system, improving memory, and sharpening the senses. Sage was officially listed in the United States Pharmacopoeia from 1840 to 1900.

Health benefits

Sage Tea or infusion of Sage is a valuable agent in the delirium of fevers and in the nervous excitement frequently accompanying brain and nervous diseases. It has a considerable reputation as a remedy, given in small and often-repeated doses. It is highly serviceable as a stimulant tonic in debility of the stomach and nervous system and weakness of digestion generally. It was for this reason that the Chinese valued it, giving it preference to their own tea. It is considered a useful medicine in typhoid fever and beneficial in biliousness and liver complaints, kidney troubles, hemorrhage from the lungs or stomach, for colds in the head as well as sore throat, quinsy, measles, for pains in the joints, lethargy and palsy. It has been used to check excessive perspiration in phthisis cases, and is useful as an emmenagogue. A cup of the strong infusion will be found good to relieve nervous headache.

What is Sage Used for?

The German Commission E approved internal use for occasional mild gastrointestinal upset and excessive sweating. Sage conatins high amounts of volatile oils with antioxidant properties. The rosmarinic acid in sage functions with antioxidant properties. The leaves and stems of the sage plant also contain antioxidant enzymes, including SOD (super oxide dismutase) and per oxidase. The ability of sage to protect oils from oxidation has also led some companies to experiment with sage as a natural antioxidant additive to cooking oils that can extend shelf life and help avoid rancidity. Polysaccharides naturally found in Sage, have immune supportive characteristics that help the membranes of the throat support a normal inflammatory response. It is also helpful in supporting normal transition in women through the cooling properties it provides. Research indicates that it may also support healthy prostate function.

The Herbal Guide to Sage: an Easy-Growing Healing Herb

Sage has been one of the most popular culinary herbs since ancient times. It adds great flavor to many different dishes, but this herb also holds a great deal of healing properties and, when planted in the garden, it attracts beneficial pollinators and prevents harmful pests. Sage is hardy and easy to grow, so if you aren’t already growing this garden powerhouse, perhaps this season is the time to begin. Read on for the essential guide to sage, which will give you all the know how you need to grow, harvest, preserve, and use sage.

Culinary sage or Salvia officinalis is a perennial herb that is native to the Mediterranean. Part of the mint family, sage grows into a bushy plant up to two-feet tall and two-feet wide. It has purple, white, or pink flowers and oblong, gray-green leaves that are covered with a fine fuzz. The leaves have a savory, earthy flavor that is especially popular for use with meat and poultry dishes.

Health Benefits

The name Salvia comes from the Latin word meaning “to save,” or “to heal,” referring to sage’s ability to heal the body. It has been used medicinally for thousands of years and is still considered a useful healing plant today. Sage is a powerful anti-inflammatory—when taken internally, it helps to reduce inflammation of the digestive tract, which in turn helps to relieve stomach pains. It is also often used to treat a sore throat, as in this recipe for sage throat lozenges.

Sage also has powerful anti-fungal and antibacterial properties. Ancient Greeks and Romans used sage as a preservative for meat because of its ability to help reduce bacteria.

In aromatherapy, the scent of sage is purported to increase focus and sharpen memory. Try keeping a pot of sage near your desk or work space and, when you start to feel your focus waning, crush up a leaf and inhale the fragrance.

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