Neem Herb Wonderful Benefits

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10 Wonderful Benefits and Uses of Neem: A Herb That Heals

In the world of Ayurveda, neem is a popular medicinal herb that’s been part of traditional remedies that date back almost 5000 years. Also known as Azadirachta Indica in English or ‘Neemba’ in Sanskrit, the neem tree is a really good example of how nature holds both the problem and the cure. It’s home to more than 130 different biologically active compounds! No wonder it’s such an effective anti-viral and anti-bacterial, along with being a powerful immune-stimulant. Murli Manohar, author of the book ‘Ayurveda For All: Effective Ayurvedic Self Cure for Common and Chronic Ailments’ suggests that the primary purpose of neem leaves is the treatment of vaata disorders or neuromuscular pains. Then come the other benefits: purify the blood, prevent damage caused by free radicals in the body, remove toxins, treat insect bites and ulcers. Neem leaves have anti-bacterial properties which is why it works wonders on infections, burns and any kind of skin problems. It destroys the bacteria that causes infections, stimulates the immune system and encourages rapid healing. We tell you some benefits of neem. 
 

Here are some excellent ways in which we can use neem leaves:

  • Wound healer: Make a paste out of the neem leaves and dab it on your wounds or insect bites a few times a day till it heals.
  • Goodbye dandruff: Boil a bunch of neem leaves till the water turns green, allow it to cool. After washing your hair with shampoo, cleanse it with this water.
  • Eye Trouble: Boil some neem leaves, let the water cool completely and then use it to wash your eyes. This will help any kind of irritation, tiredness or redness.
  • Treat that zit: Grind a few neem leaves, make a paste and apply it daily till the acne dries out. The paste also helps any kind of eruptions, dark spots and chronic ulcers.
  • Ear ailments: Blend some neem leaves and add some honey to it. Use a few drops of this mix to treat any ear boils.
  • Other skin disorders: Turmeric combined with a paste of neem leaves can also be used for itching, eczema, ring worms and some mild skin diseases.
  • Boost immunity: Crush some neem leaves and take them with a glass of water to increase your immunity.
     


Neem Flowers

Most parts of the neem tree are awfully bitter, with the exception of its flowers. White and delicate, neem flowers with their off-white buds are almost too pretty to be eaten and unbelievably therapeutic. The flowers have a sweet, almost mystical jasmine like scent at night and blossom once in the afternoon and then again in the evening. During the monsoon, you’ll see a bunch of them scattered right under the tree. Also known as Vepampoo in Tamil, these neem flowers can be used fresh, dried or in a powdered form. They’re used commonly in the South to cook a number of dishes: flower rice, pachadi, rasam, lentils and more. They’re often dry roasted and sprinkled on top of the dish to garnish as well.

Neem flowers can be used to treat anorexia, nausea, belching and intestinal worms. Ayurveda suggests neem leaves are good for the eyes and useful in treating skin disease and headaches. They’re used in aromatherapy because of their calming effect. A 2008 study also found the alcoholic extract of the neem flowers to be an effective contraceptive.

Neem Twigs & Bark

If you were born in India, you would have seen people chew away at a neem twig. For many years now, a neem twig is what people used as a make-do toothbrush. It fights germs, maintains the alkaline levels in your saliva, keeps bacteria at bay, treats swollen gums and also gives you whiter teeth. The twig also shreds into threads, almost like bristles that also destroy and prevent plaque.

Neem Oil

Neem oil that’s extracted from neem seeds is rich in medicinal properties which are what makes it a great ingredient in cosmetics and other beauty products: soaps, hair oil, hand wash, soap etc. It can treat a bunch of skin diseases and is known to be an excellent mosquito repellent. You can mix it with coconut oil and apply it over your body as well. It is believed that in India, small children are fed neem oil as a type of cure-all. Besides being such a great Ayurvedic healer, neem oil can be used to protect other plants. It can also be used in creams, soaps and other cosmetic products. Here are some great uses of neem oil you may have missed:

6 Comments1. Say no to blackheads: Take 2-3 drops of neem oil, dilute it with water and apply this mix on your blackheads. Apply this regularly to get rid of blackheads and prevent them from coming back.
2. Anti-ageing: Neem oil is extremely nourishing and can be added to your face packs. It also helps ageing skin, any kind of skin irritation and itching.
3. For great hair: Take some neem oil and rub it into the scalp, leave it in for a while and wash. Neem oil can strengthen your hair, prevent hair fall and treat dandruff.

The Health Benefits of Neem

Neem (Azadirachta indica) is a type of evergreen tree native to India. In Ayurvedic medicine, neem extract has long been used for a variety of health-related purposes.

While neem oil is generally applied to the scalp or skin to treat conditions like dandruff and acne, the extract of the neem leaf is typically taken orally. In some cases, the bark, flowers, and fruit of the neem tree are also used medicinally.

In alternative medicine, neem is said to help with a number of health problems, including:

Additionally, neem is purported to reduce inflammation, improve liver health, alleviate pain, preserve eyesight, stimulate the immune system, and protect against heart disease.

Health Benefits

Although few scientific studies have tested the health effects of neem, there’s some evidence that it may offer certain benefits. Here’s a look at some key findings from the available research:

Dental Health

Neem may help fight plaque buildup and prevent gingivitis, several studies suggest.

In a 2017 study, 20 subjects were given mouthwash with either chlorhexidine gluconate, a substance commonly used to prevent gum disease, or neem. The researchers found neem mouthwash was as effective as the medication and suggest neem may be a cost-effective alternative to chlorhexidine gluconate treatments.1

An earlier study published in 2004 in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology 36 men were assigned to six weeks of treatment with either a gel containing neem extract, or mouthwash containing chlorhexidine gluconate. Study results showed that the need-based gel was more effective in reducing plaque buildup than the mouthwash.2

In addition, a study published in the Indian Journal of Dental Research in 1999 determined that the use of chewing sticks made with neem extract may help protect against the buildup of bacteria associated with cavity formation and periodontal disease.3

Ulcers

Neem shows promise in the treatment of gastric ulcers, suggests a 2009 report from Physiotherapy Research. Analyzing findings from preliminary studies, scientists concluded that neem bark extract may help aid in ulcer control possibly by inhibiting the secretion of gastric acids.4

Cancer

A 2011 research review published in Cancer Biology & Therapy indicates that neem may offer anti-cancer benefits, including immune-stimulating and tumor-suppressing properties. However, there is currently a lack of clinical trials testing the effectiveness of neem in the prevention or treatment of any type of cancer.5

Possible Side Effects

Neem supplements are likely safe when taken orally short term for adults, but should not be used in children.

While doses of up to 60 mg daily for up to 10 weeks have been safely used in human research, little is known about the safety of long-term use of neem supplements.

Since neem may increase activity in the immune system, it’s crucial for people with autoimmune disorders (such as multiple sclerosis, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis) to take caution when using neem. People who are taking lithium or immunosuppressants should not take neem.

In addition, people taking diabetes medication should consult their physician prior to using neem. Because neem may reduce blood sugar levels, using neem in combination with diabetes medications may cause blood sugar to drop to dangerously low levels.

Neem may have a negative interaction with lithium, altering the body’s ability to metabolize the drug and could lead to dangerous interactions.

There’s also some concern that neem may cause damage to the kidneys and liver, and may lower sperm counts.

The bark is used for malaria, stomach and intestinal ulcers, skin diseases, pain, and fever.

The flower is used for reducing bile, controlling phlegm, and treating intestinal worms.

The fruit is used for hemorrhoids, intestinal worms, urinary tract disorders, bloody nose, phlegm, eye disorders, diabetes, wounds, and leprosy.

Neem twigs are used for cough, asthma, hemorrhoids, intestinal worms, low sperm levels, urinary disorders, and diabetes. People in the tropics sometimes chew neem twigs instead of using toothbrushes, but this can cause illness; neem twigs are often contaminated with fungi within 2 weeks of harvest and should be avoided.

The seed and seed oil are used for leprosy and intestinal worms. They are also used for birth control and to cause abortions.

The stem, root bark, and fruit are used as a tonic and astringent.

Some people apply neem directly to the skin to treat head lice, skin diseases, wounds, and skin ulcers; as a mosquito repellent; and as a skin softener.

Neem is a tree. The bark, leaves, and seeds are used to make medicine. Less often, the root, flower, and fruit are also used.

Neem leaf is used for leprosy, eye disorders, bloody nose, intestinal worms, stomach upset, loss of appetite, skin ulcers, diseases of the heart and blood vessels (cardiovascular disease), fever, diabetes, gum disease (gingivitis), and liver problems. The leaf is also used for birth control and to cause abortions.

The bark is used for malaria, stomach and intestinal ulcers, skin diseases, pain, and fever.

The flower is used for reducing bile, controlling phlegm, and treating intestinal worms.

The fruit is used for hemorrhoids, intestinal worms, urinary tract disorders, bloody nose, phlegm, eye disorders, diabetes, wounds, and leprosy.

Neem twigs are used for cough, asthma, hemorrhoids, intestinal worms, low sperm levels, urinary disorders, and diabetes. People in the tropics sometimes chew neem twigs instead of using toothbrushes, but this can cause illness; neem twigs are often contaminated with fungi within 2 weeks of harvest and should be avoided.

The seed and seed oil are used for leprosy and intestinal worms. They are also used for birth control and to cause abortions.

The stem, root bark, and fruit are used as a tonic and astringent.

Some people apply neem directly to the skin to treat head lice, skin diseases, wounds, and skin ulcers; as a mosquito repellent; and as a skin softener.

Neem Tree, also known as ‘Azadirachta indica’ is a tree native to India. In Sanskrit, neem is arista, which means something that is perfect, imperishable and complete. Not only its leaves, but the tree’s seeds, roots and bark also contain important compounds that have many medicinal and beauty properties. The tree is supposed to denote ‘good health’ in our Ayurveda.

Neem is best known for its anti-aging properties. Due to its antioxidant properties, neem protects the skin from harmful UV rays, pollution and other environmental factors. The vitamins and fatty acids in neem improve and maintain the elasticity of the skin, reduce wrinkles and fine lines. This make you and your skin look rejuvenated and youthful.
Neem is also beneficial in fighting against fungal infection. Its anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties keep the harmful bacteria and fungi at bay. Thus, it protects the skin and keeps the skin related diseases away.

Ayurveda, which follows the natural ways for treatment and medicine, has been using extracts of neem tree as a key ingredient, for good health and well being. Here are some of the herbal remedies, health benefits and magical properties of neem…
Neem Herbal Remedy and Benefit : One tree pharmacy

Not only in Ayurvedic medicines, neem tree extracts have been a part of many home remedies that Indians have been following since time immemorial. We use neem to treat hair and skin issues.

Anti-fungal and anti-bacterial

Neem leaves are used to treat fungal and bacterial infections. They are used to treat warts as well as chicken pox. Either the paste is applied on the affected area or the person is made to bathe in neem water. It can also treat foot fungi.

Insecticide

You can keep neem soaked cotton near your windows or burn neem leaves to ward off insects. It is extremely effective and is used to fight mosquito menace.

Increases immunity

Many Ayurveda experts recommend daily intake of neem capsules. Neem tea is also widely prescribed to reduce fever, especially the malaria one. Since neem tastes bitter, the tea acquires a similar taste but works magically.

Nature’s toothbrush

Chewing neem twigs for dental hygiene and care is an age-old Indian tradition. In Indian households, people used to brush their teeth using twigs of neem. And these days you find nee-based toothpaste to ensure good dental health. Due to its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti fungal properties, it keeps away all sorts of dental infections and diseases.
Neem Herbal Remedy and Benefit : Strong and long hair

Neem also helps in strengthening hair quality and promotes growth of hair. Neem paste is also used as a hair conditioner. Due to its antibacterial, anti fungal and anti-inflammatory properties, neem is an excellent way to curb dandruff. This makes hair follicles stronger, thus encouraging hair growth too. It provides the required nourishment and conditioning to the roots, making them stronger and shinier.
Neem Herbal Remedy and Benefit : Treat skin disorder

There are many formulations in Ayurveda that are used to treat skin issues. It is because it has a detoxifying property. It is used to treat sczema and other skin infections.
Neem Herbal Remedy and Benefit : Healer

Neem can heal wounds without leaving any ugly scars. It also prevents septic infections. Neem is commonly used to heal wounds because of its antiseptic properties. Apply a little amount of neem oil onto the wounds and on scars, daily. Neem Oil contains the necessary fatty acids, which also promote wound healing and make your skin healthy.
Neem Herbal Remedy and Benefit : Acne relief

Neem also has anti-inflammatory property that reduces acne. The neem oil is believed to relieve skin dryness, skin itchiness and redness. It also prevents pimples and skin blemishes.
Neem Herbal Remedy and Benefit

This is not it. Neem is also used in organic farming. The popular neem seed cake, which is basically a neem seed residue which is left after oil extraction, is extremely beneficial for enriching the soil. It also brings down nitrogen loss and works as a nematicide.

Other benefits

Neem is also an excellent source of moisturizer for the skin. By applying neem oil, the fatty acids and vitamins in it moisturize and condition your skin, making it clearer and youthful. The vitamin E in neem oil repairs the damaged skin and also limits the effect of environment changes that can lead to skin damage.

You will commonly find neem used in products such as bath powders, shampoos, skin lotion, toothpaste and many companies have even started marketing neem leaf capsule for better immunity.


 

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