Ancient Herbs

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Ancient Herbs Of India offers you a variety of products which is related with your day to day life. And all the products is neither harmful nor have any side effects for your health because it is made with the real herbs which is found in India. All the products of Ancient Herbs Of India is very effective because it eliminates the diseases form the root. Because of ill health one is not able to live their life happily and we understand the value of healthy living. So Ancient Herbs of India prefers the ayurvedic treatment to treat all disease. Because Ayurveda has no side effects and it is the oldest way of treatment.

Ancient Herbs of India is a very reliable and scientific system of natural health and care. It completely follows our tradition of Ayurved which comes from ancient time when there were no allopathic medicine. The only aim of our organization is to create a disease free India. We deal in Herbs and ayurvedic medicines. We have a complete range of 100% natural and effective herbs . Because of our highest quality we assure you to provide the most effective and active product without any harm. Our products is 100% organic and natural.

It is our pride to be honest with our deals because we know the value of HEALTHY LIVING. We are dedicated to our customers because “WITHOUT YOU WE ARE NOTHING”. Our organization is currently busy to provide you the best medicines for your diseases through a natural way. We use whole plants, authentic ayurvedic ingredients which effect your mind , soul , body and emotions. And create a very positive environment for you.

Ancient Herbs of India realizes the importance of harmless medicines with best quality products. Ayurveda came from the Ancient India that’s why only we can understand the need of ayurveda in today’s world. We strictly follow the instructions and procedures which is available in our ancient books of ayurveda.

The history of herbal ism is closely tied with the history of medicine from prehistoric times up until the development of the germ theory of disease in the 19th century. Modern medicine from the 19th century to today has been based on evidence gathered using the scientific method. Evidence-based use of pharmaceutical drugs, often derived from medicinal plants, has largely replaced herbal treatments in modern health care. However, many people continue to employ various forms of traditional or alternative medicine. These systems often have a significant herbal component. The history of herbal ism also overlaps with food history, as many of the herbs and spices historically used by humans to season food yield useful medicinal compounds,and use of spices with antimicrobial activity in cooking is part of an ancient response to the threat of food-borne pathogens

Researchers in the Department of Physiology & Biophysics at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine have discovered the molecular basis for a therapeutic action of an ancient herbal medicine used across Africa to treat various illnesses, including epilepsy.

The herbal medicine, a leaf extract from the shrub Mal lotus opposition, was previously found to be effective in controlling seizures but the mechanism was unknown. The discovery, published in Nature Communications, found that two components of the Mal-lotus leaf extract activate KCNQ2/3, a potassium ion channel essential for controlling electrical activity in the brain. The two components were somewhat effective alone, but in combination were highly effective both at activating KCNQ2/3 channels and at preventing life-threatening seizures.

The UCI research team, comprising postdoctoral fellow Ryan Mandeville, PhD and principal investigator Geoffrey Abbott, MSc, PhD, screened individual compounds from the leaf extract for channel opening activity, and then combined the two most active compounds to discover the therapeutic synergy contained in an African folk remedy used for centuries. Strikingly, one of the two compounds identified, isovaleric acid, is also a main component of valerian root, an herb used in ancient Greece as an insomnia sleep remedy, and for centuries by the English and also native Americans as an anticonvulsant. Valerian root is still used by as many as 2 million people each week in the United States as an herbal remedy for anxiety and insomnia.

“We are very interested in taking a molecular approach to ethnography — the study of plants and their use by local populations — to discover the molecular mechanisms for ancient remedies and to use this knowledge to create safer and more effective drugs. The KC channels we study are typically opened by electrical activity, but we know that they are also incredibly sensitive to the presence of small molecules, including neurotransmitters, but also molecules from outside, such as drugs, and constituents of food and herbal extracts,” said Abbott. “Some folk medicines are in danger of being lost, either because traditional practices are being forgotten, or because the plant species used are endangered. Species loss can arise from over-collecting, habitat destruction, or climate change. There is a race against time to prevent this incredible resource being lost forever.”

The UCI team found that the herbal extract they studied had different channel sub-type preferences than modern drugs that activate the KCNQ2/3 channel, such as the anticonvulsant drug, retigabine. Because of this, by combining the herbal compounds with retigabine, they were able to completely lock open the channel, a feat not previously achieved.

“Locking open the channel is a neat trick, but it could also have clinical implications. Retigabine was removed from the market last year because of a surprising side effect: it turns the skin and whites of the eyes blue. However, by combining retigabine with the herbal components, we found we could greatly reduce the retigabine dosage required for activity. This type of strategy might one day enable us to use drugs like retigabine at dosages low enough to be safe, whilst retaining or even enhancing their efficacy by combining them with natural booster compounds derived from plants,” said Abbott.

In addition to the booster effects of the herbal extract, identification of the ability of specific chemicals within plants to activate influential ion channels such as KCNQ2/3 may lead one day to new epilepsy, anxiety and pain drugs that exploit the alternative chemical spaces offered by the molecular constituents of ethnological.

Food is the major source for serving the nutritional needs, but with growing modernization some traditional ways are being given up. Affluence of working population with changing lifestyles and reducing affordability of sick care, in terms of time and money involved, are some of the forces that are presently driving people towards thinking about their wellness. There has been increased global interest in traditional medicine. Efforts to monitor and regulate traditional herbal medicine are underway. Ayurveda, the traditional Indian medicine, remains the most ancient yet living traditions. Although India has been successful in promoting its therapies with more research and science-based approach, it still needs more extensive research and evidence base. Increased side effects, lack of curative treatment for several chronic diseases, high cost of new drugs, microbial resistance and emerging, diseases are some reasons for renewed public interest in complementary and alternative medicines. Numerous nutraceutical combinations have entered the international market through exploration of ethnopharmacological claims made by different traditional practices. This review gives an overview of the Ayurvedic system of medicine and its role in translation-al medicine in order to overcome malnutrition and related disorders.

India is known for its traditional medicinal systems—Ayurveda, Siddha, and Unani. Medical systems are found mentioned even in the ancient Vedas and other scriptures. The Ayurvedic concept appeared and developed between 2500 and 500 BC in India The literal meaning of Ayurveda is “science of life,” because ancient Indian system of health care focused on views of man and his illness. It has been pointed out that the positive health means metabolically well-balanced human beings. Ayurveda is also called the “science of longevity” because it offers a complete system to live a long healthy life. It offers programs to rejuvenate the body through diet and nutrition. It offers treatment methods to cure many common diseases such as food allergies, which have few modern treatments. However, one should be aware that Ayurvedic nutrition is not a “magic bullet” system but requires the full participation of the patient to succeed. It is an interactive system that is user-friendly and educational. It teaches the patient to become responsible and self-empowered. Ayurveda is not a nutritional system for those seeking an escape or excuse to further abuse their body or mind. It is a system for empowerment, a system of freedom, and long life.

Food is the major source for serving the nutritional needs, but with growing modernization some traditional methods are being given up (Table Hence, the modern food habits are affecting the balanced nutrition There is an ever widening gap in nutrient intake due to which normal life is no longer normal. However, affluence of working population with changing lifestyles and reducing affordability of sick care, in terms of time and money involved, are some of the forces that are presently driving people towards thinking about their wellness.

9 of the World’s Most Popular Herbal Medicines

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For centuries, cultures around the world have relied on traditional herbal medicine to meet their healthcare needs.

Despite medical and technological advancements of the modern era, the global demand for herbal remedies is on the rise. In fact, it’s estimated that this industry grosses about $60 billion annually (1Trusted Source).

Some natural remedies may be more affordable and accessible than conventional medicines, and many people prefer using them because they align with their personal health ideologies (1Trusted Source).

All the same, you may wonder whether herbal options are effective.

Here are 9 of the world’s most popular herbal medicines, including their main benefits, uses, and relevant safety information.

1. Echinacea

Echinacea, or cone flower, is a flowering plant and popular herbal remedy.

Originally from North America, it has long been used in Native American practices to treat a variety of ailments, including wounds, burns, toothaches, sore throat, and upset stomach (2Trusted Source).

Most parts of the plant, including the leaves, petals, and roots, can be used medicinally — though many people believe the roots have the strongest effect.

Echinacea is usually taken as a tea or supplement but can also be applied topically.

Today, it’s primarily used to treat or prevent the common cold, though the science behind this isn’t particularly strong.

One review in over 4,000 people found a potential 10–20% reduced risk of colds from taking echinacea, but there’s little to no evidence that it treats the cold after you have caught it (3Trusted Source).

Though insufficient data exists to evaluate the long-term effects of this herb, short-term use is generally considered safe. That said, side effects like nausea, stomach pain, and skin rash have occasionally been reported (4Trusted Source).

2. Ginseng

Ginseng is a medicinal plant whose roots are usually steeped to make a tea or dried to make a powder.

It’s frequently utilized in traditional Chinese medicine to reduce inflammation and boost immunity, brain function, and energy levels.

Several varieties exist, but the two most popular are the Asian and American types — Pan ax ginseng and Pan ax quinquefolius, respectively. American ginseng is thought to cultivate relaxation, while Asian ginseng is considered more stimulating (5Trusted Source).

Although ginseng has been used for centuries, modern research supporting its efficacy is lacking.

Several test-tube and animal studies suggest that its unique compounds, called ginsenosides, boast neuroprotective, anticancer, anti diabetes, and immune-supporting properties. Nonetheless, human research is needed (6Trusted Source).

Short-term use is considered relatively safe, but ginseng’s long-term safety remains unclear. Potential side effects include headaches, poor sleep, and digestive issues (7Trusted Source).

3. Ginkgo biloba

Ginkgo biloba, also known simply as ginkgo, is an herbal medicine derived from the maidenhair tree (8Trusted Source).

Native to China, ginkgo has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years and remains a top-selling herbal supplement today. It contains a variety of potent antioxidants that are thought to provide several benefits (8Trusted Source).

The seeds and leaves are traditionally used to make teas and tinctures, but most modern applications use leaf extract.

Some people also enjoy eating the raw fruit and toasted seeds. However, the seeds are mildly toxic and should only be eaten in small quantities, if at all.

Ginkgo is said to treat a wide range of ailments, including heart disease, dementia, mental difficulties, and sexual dysfunction. Yet, studies have not proven it effective for any of these conditions (9Trusted Source).

Although it’s well tolerated by most people, possible side effects include headache, heart palpitations, digestive issues, skin reactions, and an increased risk of bleeding (9Trusted Source).

4. Elderberry

Elderberry is an ancient herbal medicine typically made from the cooked fruit of the Sambucus nigra plant. It has long been used to relieve headaches, nerve pain, toothaches, colds, viral infections, and constipation (10).

Today, it’s primarily marketed as a treatment for symptoms associated with the flu and common cold.

Elderberry is available as a syrup or lozenge, although there’s no standard dosage. Some people prefer to make their own syrup or tea by cooking elderberries with other ingredients, such as honey and ginger.

Test-tube studies demonstrate that its plant compounds have antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antiviral properties, but human research is lacking (11Trusted Source).

While a few small human studies indicate that elderberry shortens the duration of flu infections, larger studies are needed to determine if it’s any more effective than conventional antiviral therapies (12Trusted Source, 13Trusted Source, 14Trusted Source).

Short-term use is considered safe, but the unripe or raw fruit is toxic and may cause symptoms like nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea (15Trusted Source).

Keep an eye out for this herbal remedy when you’re next in a health shop, or buy it online.

5. St. John’s wort

St. John’s wort (SJW) is an herbal medicine derived from the flowering plant Hypercube perforatum. Its small, yellow flowers are commonly used to make teas, capsules, or extracts (16Trusted Source).

Its use can be traced back to ancient Greece, and SJW is still frequently prescribed by medical professionals in parts of Europe (16Trusted Source).

Historically, it was utilized to aid wound healing and alleviate insomnia, depression, and various kidney and lung diseases. Today, it’s largely prescribed to treat mild to moderate depression.

Many studies note that short-term use of SJW is as effective as some conventional antidepressants. However, there’s limited data on long-term safety or effectiveness for those with severe depression or suicidal thoughts (17Trusted Source).

SJW has relatively few side effects but may cause allergic reactions, dizziness, confusion, dry mouth, and increased light sensitivity (16Trusted Source).

It also interferes with numerous medications, including antidepressants, birth control, blood thinners, certain pain medications, and some types of cancer treatments (16Trusted Source).

Particular drug interactions could be fatal, so if you take any prescription medications, consult your healthcare provider prior to using SJW.

6. Turmeric

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is an herb that belongs to the ginger family (18Trusted Source).

Used for thousands of years in cooking and medicine alike, it has recently garnered attention for its potent anti-inflammatory properties.

Curcumin is the major active compound in turmeric. It may treat a host of conditions, including chronic inflammation, pain, metabolic syndrome, and anxiety (18Trusted Source).

In particular, multiple studies reveal that supplemental doses of curcumin are as effective for alleviating arthritis pain as some common anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen (18Trusted Source).

Both turmeric and curcumin supplements are widely considered safe, but very high doses may lead to diarrhea, headache, or skin irritation.

You can also use fresh or dried turmeric in dishes like curries, although the amount you typically eat in food isn’t likely to have a significant medicinal effect.

7. Ginger

Ginger is a commonplace ingredient and herbal medicine. You can eat it fresh or dried, though its main medicinal forms are as a tea or capsule.

Much like turmeric, ginger is a rhizome, or stem that grows underground. It contains a variety of beneficial compounds and has long been used in traditional and folk practices to treat colds, nausea, migraines, and high blood pressure (18Trusted Source, 19Trusted Source).

Its best-established modern use is for relieving nausea associated with pregnancy, chemotherapy, and medical operations (19Trusted Source).

Furthermore, test-tube and animal research reveals potential benefits for treating and preventing illnesses like heart disease and cancer, although the evidence is mixed (19Trusted Source).

Some small human studies propose that this root may reduce your risk of blood clot formation, although it hasn’t been proven any more effective than conventional therapies (19Trusted Source).

Ginger is very well tolerated. Negative side effects are rare, but large doses may cause a mild case of heartburn or diarrhea (20Trusted Source).

You can find ginger supplements at your local supermarket and online.

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8. Valerian

Sometimes referred to as “nature’s Valium,” valerian is a flowering plant whose roots are thought to induce tranquility and a sense of calm.

Valerian root may be dried and consumed in capsule form or steeped to make tea.

Its use can be traced back to ancient Greece and Rome, where it was taken to relieve restlessness, tremors, headaches, and heart palpitations. Today, it’s most often utilized to treat insomnia and anxiety (21).

Still, evidence supporting these uses isn’t particularly strong (22Trusted Source).

One review found valerian to be somewhat effective for inducing sleep, but many of the study results were based on subjective reports from participants (23Trusted Source).

Valerian is relatively safe, though it may cause mild side effects like headaches and digestive issues. You shouldn’t take it if you’re on any other sedatives due to the risk of compounding effects, such as excessive malaise and drowsiness (21).

9. Chamomile

Chamomile is a flowering plant that also happens to be one of the most popular herbal medicines in the world.

The flowers are most often used to make tea, but the leaves may also be dried and used for making tea, medicinal extracts, or topical compresses.

For thousands of years, chamomile has been used as a remedy for nausea, diarrhea, constipation, stomach pain, urinary tract infections, wounds, and upper respiratory infections (24Trusted Source).

This herb packs over 100 active compounds, many of which are thought to contribute to its numerous benefits (24Trusted Source).

Several test-tube and animal studies have demonstrated anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activity, though insufficient human research is available (25Trusted Source).

Yet, a few small human studies suggest that chamomile treats diarrhea, emotional disturbances as well as cramping associated with premenstrual syndrome (PMS), and pain and inflammation linked to osteoarthritis (25Trusted Source).

Chamomile is safe for most people but may cause an allergic reaction — especially if you’re allergic to similar plants, such as daisies, ragweed, or marigolds (26Trusted Source).

Precautions for using herbal medicines

If you’re considering taking herbal supplements, it’s best to consult a health professional to ensure proper dosage, understand potential side effects, and watch out for reactions with other medications.

Because herbal medicines are derived from natural sources, people often assume that they’re inherently safe — but this isn’t necessarily the case.

Like conventional drugs, herbal supplements may cause serious side effects or interfere with other medications you’re taking.

For instance, raw elderberries can be toxic, St. John’s wort can interact dangerously with antidepressants, and valerian root can compound the effects of sedatives.

Additionally, many herbal medicines have not been studied rigorously enough to verify their safety for pregnant or breastfeeding women.

Thus, if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, you should talk to your healthcare provider prior to taking any herbal medicines to ensure the best possible outcomes for you and your baby.

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